Important notice to customers — product packaging changesLearn More

NEW FOOD PACKAGING IN STORE NOW

From August 2018, customers will notice our rebranded food packaging start to appear on shelf in all major stockists.

  • CURRENT Packaging
  • new Packaging

We are excited to announce our new packaging will start to appear on shelf from August 2018. This transition to new packaging will occur over a number of months. During this time there will be a mix of current and new packaging on shelf.

There are no major changes to these products, in some instances there is a small name change or slight recipe improvement, see below for the full details.

Products purchased via the website will be delivered to customers in our old packaging until the end of October. From November, products ordered from the website will be delivered in the new packaging.

Please note, our Infant Formula packaging will not be rebranded until later in 2019.

For any questions, connect with our team of accredited practising Dietitians on +61 3 6332 9200

Product name changes

  • Cereal Name Changes
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Baby Rice
  • NEW Packaging Organic Rice with Prebiotic (GOS) Note: Our Baby Rice recipe has been upgraded to now include GOS Prebiotic
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Vanilla Rice Custard
  • NEW Packaging Organic Milk & Vanilla Baby Rice
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Apple & Cinnamon Porridge
  • NEW Packaging Organic Apple & Cinnamon Baby Porridge
  • Ready To Serve Name Changes
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Banana, Pear & Mango
  • New Packaging Organic Banana, Pear, Apple & Mango
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Mango, Blueberry & Apple
  • New Packaging Organic Blueberry, Mango & Apple
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Peach & Apple
  • New Packaging Organic Grape, Apple & Peach
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Pumpkin & Tomato Risotto
  • New Packaging Organic Pumpkin, Sweet Potato & Tomato
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Broccoli, Beef & Brown Rice
  • New Packaging Organic Beef & Vegetables
  • Note: We have also upgraded some of our RTS recipes to remove added sugars and to remove some of the more complex ingredients that are not required for young children such as Tamari.
  • RUSKS NAME CHANGES
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Milk Rusks Toothiepegs
  • New Packaging Organic Milk Rusks

When should my baby eat wheat?

Introducing wheat at four months of age and not delaying this until after six months of age, is currently thought to decrease the chances of developing an allergy to wheat.

Wheat allergy and Coeliac Disease are the two main medical conditions related to wheat in childhood. Children with wheat allergy need only avoid wheat, while those with coeliac disease need to avoid gluten. Gluten is found in wheat, rye, triticale, spelt, barley and controversially oats.

Can I prevent my child from developing these diseases?

The answer right now is NO, but there is research looking into factors that might decrease the chances. In both groups breast feeding is encouraged, and food introduction should not begin before the child is four months old.

Wheat allergy

Parents are now encouraged to add small amounts of foods to the babies’ diet that contain the known food allergens. Wheat is now suggested from four months.

Unlike a typical wheat allergy which starts as a baby and is mostly outgrown by primary school, coeliac disease can be diagnosed at any age.

Coeliac Disease

Science does not have as clear a picture on what to advise for coeliac disease, because five, ten or more years after the child left the research study, they could still develop coeliac disease. Suggesting diet changes made as a baby might not really matter in the longer term.

When the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines to introduce gluten to babies was developed in 2016, it was thought that the specific genetics of the child was the strongest determinant of whether the child developed coeliac disease or not. That may still be the case. Here are current early diet suggestions, but they are not official recommendations, as we don’t know how many from these studies below, will go on to develop coeliac disease later in life.

A recent 2020 study suggests that from the age of four months, at least two wheat breakfast biscuits should be consumed in a week. The group who did this had less coeliac disease three years later than those who delayed gluten introduction until after six months.

A 2019 study concluded that more coeliac disease developed in children eating the greatest quantities of gluten between 1-2 years of age. The research suggests that at most, 2-3 slices of wheat bread equivalent food choices should be eaten a day, between the age of one and two years. Use gluten free grain food choices to fill out the grain food for the rest of the day.

It’s important to understand that your baby or child may still develop either condition. If you feel your baby is reacting to wheat or gluten foods, then stop those foods and investigate this with your doctor.

 

REFERENCES

  1. https://www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-prevention
  2. JA et al. Timing of Initial Exposure to Cereal Grains and the Risk of Wheat Allergy. Pediatrics  2006, 117 (6) 2175-2182; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2005-1803.
  3. Szajewska H et al. Gluten Introduction and the risk of coeliac disease: A position paper by the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition. JPGN, Vol 62(3);2016:507-513
  4. Lionetti E et al. Introduction of Gluten, HLA Status, and the Risk of Celiac Disease in Children. Italian Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition. Working Group on Weaning and CD Risk. New England J Med, 2014, Oct;1295-1303.
  5. Logan K. Early Gluten Introduction and Celiac Disease in the EAT Study. A Prespecified Analysis of the EAT Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Pediatr. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.2893. Published online September 28, 2020.
  6. Mårild K et al. Gluten Intake and Risk of Celiac Disease: Long-Term Follow-up of an At-Risk Birth Cohort. Am J Gastroenterol, 2019;00:1–8.

About the author

Dr. Kim Faulkner-Hogg: BSc, Grad Dip Nutr & Diet, Adv APD, AN, PhD Kim is an Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian with more than 20 years experience with coeliac disease and food intolerances. Kim has completed her PhD in Coeliac disease and the gluten free diet and was a consultant dietitian to Coeliac NSW/Australia for a number of years. She has a Private Practice in Malabar, Sydney and she lectures to dietitians, other health professionals, the food industry and the public on these topics.

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Welcome to Bellamy’s Organic.

Please read this important message.

If you are able, breastfeeding is best, as it provides the ideal nutrition for babies and has other important health benefits too. Health Professionals are well placed to provide appropriate feeding advice and support. A healthy diet during pregnancy and whilst breastfeeding is important.

Introducing infant formula either partially or exclusively, may reduce the supply of breast milk. Once reduced, it is difficult to re-establish. Social and financial implications, such as preparation requirements and cost of formula until 12 months, should be considered. When using infant formula, always follow the instructions for use carefully, unnecessary or improper use may make your baby unwell.

Information about Bellamy’s Organic products is solely for educational and informational purposes only, and should not be substituted for medical advice. If you would like to proceed, please click "I understand".