Important notice to customers — product packaging changesLearn More

NEW FOOD PACKAGING IN STORE NOW

From August 2018, customers will notice our rebranded food packaging start to appear on shelf in all major stockists.

  • CURRENT Packaging
  • new Packaging

We are excited to announce our new packaging will start to appear on shelf from August 2018. This transition to new packaging will occur over a number of months. During this time there will be a mix of current and new packaging on shelf.

There are no major changes to these products, in some instances there is a small name change or slight recipe improvement, see below for the full details.

Products purchased via the website will be delivered to customers in our old packaging until the end of October. From November, products ordered from the website will be delivered in the new packaging.

Please note, our Infant Formula packaging will not be rebranded until later in 2019.

For any questions, connect with our team of accredited practising Dietitians on +61 3 6332 9200

Product name changes

  • Cereal Name Changes
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Baby Rice
  • NEW Packaging Organic Rice with Prebiotic (GOS) Note: Our Baby Rice recipe has been upgraded to now include GOS Prebiotic
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Vanilla Rice Custard
  • NEW Packaging Organic Milk & Vanilla Baby Rice
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Apple & Cinnamon Porridge
  • NEW Packaging Organic Apple & Cinnamon Baby Porridge
  • Ready To Serve Name Changes
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Banana, Pear & Mango
  • New Packaging Organic Banana, Pear, Apple & Mango
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Mango, Blueberry & Apple
  • New Packaging Organic Blueberry, Mango & Apple
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Peach & Apple
  • New Packaging Organic Grape, Apple & Peach
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Pumpkin & Tomato Risotto
  • New Packaging Organic Pumpkin, Sweet Potato & Tomato
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Broccoli, Beef & Brown Rice
  • New Packaging Organic Beef & Vegetables
  • Note: We have also upgraded some of our RTS recipes to remove added sugars and to remove some of the more complex ingredients that are not required for young children such as Tamari.
  • RUSKS NAME CHANGES
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Milk Rusks Toothiepegs
  • New Packaging Organic Milk Rusks

Susie Burrell’s Tips for Fussy Eaters

bellamysorganic-susie-burrells-tips-for-fussy-eaters

Hands up if you have a fussy eater?

Chances are if you have a toddler aged one to three years old, at some point they have demonstrated fussy eating behaviours. It is to be expected at this age but the key thing for parents is to know how to manage it — without making the fussiness worse.

New research published in the Journal of Child Health Care has identified specific parental behaviour that is linked to successfully managing and reducing fussy eating — as well as those behaviours that appear to make it worse. The findings may surprise you.

Fussy eating, or the tendency of small children to be extremely finicky about what they will and will not eat is explained somewhat by the developmental stage children are going through at these ages. What they will or will not put into their mouths is one of the few things small children do have control over. As such, they like to exert this and send their parents the message that they are in control.

While our natural instinct is to focus on the fussy eating in an attempt to stop and reduce it, findings show that this attention can become the goal and an incentive for fussy behaviour. If you are tempted to bribe children to eat the right foods, remember that this does very little to reduce the fussy eating as it also gives children control of the situation. The research, using focus groups of 30 parents, found that the simple act of repeatedly offering small children the very same foods, even if they had to deal with a tantrum, was one of the best ways to eventually get kids to eat the foods parents wanted them to.

Parental modelling was also identified as exceptionally important. Additionally, involving children in food prep, and combining foods typically rejected with other tasty ingredients such as cheese also worked. The efforts which did not work as well included preparing special meals for children making a fuss, or letting them only eat what they wanted.

Findings from three focus groups give parents a clear message when it comes to managing fussy eating. If our goal is to reduce fussy eating behaviours there are four key actions we can take:

  • Keep offering our kids the foods we want them to eat
  • Make the meals as fun and appealing as possible
  • Involve the kids in food preparation
  • Remember, if they are still refusing to eat the foods we would like them to, don’t stress or focus on it, and continue offering these foods.

Behavioural patterns in small children are developed quickly from copying or mimicking parents, and from receiving attention from certain behaviours. With this in mind, it is important to reward children’s positive behaviour, and to place little focus on fussy eating and other poor food behaviours. This can be easier said than done, but research shows that consistency with this (even through a few tantrums) will have small children eating the right foods faster.

About the author

Important Notice to Parents and Guardians

  • The World Health Organisation recommends that breastfeeding is best for your baby.
  • Having a balanced diet when breastfeeding is also important. Infant Formulas should only be used after you’ve sought advice from a doctor or health practitioner.
  • A decision not to breastfeed can be difficult to reverse and introducing partial bottle feeding may reduce the supply of breast milk. It is also wise to consider the cost of infant formula.
  • If you use infant formula, all preparation and feeding instructions must be followed as per the manufacturer’s instructions. This is important for your baby’s health.