Important notice to customers — product packaging changesLearn More

NEW FOOD PACKAGING IN STORE NOW

From August 2018, customers will notice our rebranded food packaging start to appear on shelf in all major stockists.

  • CURRENT Packaging
  • new Packaging

We are excited to announce our new packaging will start to appear on shelf from August 2018. This transition to new packaging will occur over a number of months. During this time there will be a mix of current and new packaging on shelf.

There are no major changes to these products, in some instances there is a small name change or slight recipe improvement, see below for the full details.

Products purchased via the website will be delivered to customers in our old packaging until the end of October. From November, products ordered from the website will be delivered in the new packaging.

Please note, our Infant Formula packaging will not be rebranded until later in 2019.

For any questions, connect with our team of accredited practising Dietitians on +61 3 6332 9200

Product name changes

  • Cereal Name Changes
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Baby Rice
  • NEW Packaging Organic Rice with Prebiotic (GOS) Note: Our Baby Rice recipe has been upgraded to now include GOS Prebiotic
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Vanilla Rice Custard
  • NEW Packaging Organic Milk & Vanilla Baby Rice
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Apple & Cinnamon Porridge
  • NEW Packaging Organic Apple & Cinnamon Baby Porridge
  • Ready To Serve Name Changes
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Banana, Pear & Mango
  • New Packaging Organic Banana, Pear, Apple & Mango
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Mango, Blueberry & Apple
  • New Packaging Organic Blueberry, Mango & Apple
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Peach & Apple
  • New Packaging Organic Grape, Apple & Peach
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Pumpkin & Tomato Risotto
  • New Packaging Organic Pumpkin, Sweet Potato & Tomato
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Broccoli, Beef & Brown Rice
  • New Packaging Organic Beef & Vegetables
  • Note: We have also upgraded some of our RTS recipes to remove added sugars and to remove some of the more complex ingredients that are not required for young children such as Tamari.
  • RUSKS NAME CHANGES
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Milk Rusks Toothiepegs
  • New Packaging Organic Milk Rusks
Home/Nutrition & Recipes/Articles/Infant & Toddler Nutrition/Nutrition/How Much Sugar Is Your Toddler Eating?

How Much Sugar Is Your Toddler Eating?

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The chances are you know that added sugars in the diet are not great for infants and small children – or adults either for that matter! Yet, unless you are extremely fussy with the types and brands of food you are buying and serving to your family, some extra sugars are bound to slip in.

In fact, we know that Aussie kids aged two to five years are getting up to 30 per cent of their daily calories from extra food. These extras are the cakes, muffins, biscuits, snack foods and treats that they should be eating occasionally only – and are all foods packed with added sugars. So, if you are unsure of exactly how much sugar your little one is consuming, it might be time to pay closer attention.

Types of sugar in food

There is a big difference between naturally occurring sugars found in dairy (lactose) and fruit (fructose) and added sugars. Added sugars can come via a range of ingredients including glucose syrup, rice malt syrup, honey, gels and sugar itself. The issue with added sugars is that they are associated with more processed foods in general and are often adding sweet foods to the diet. The sweeter the foods we consume, the more we are likely to want. As such when young children consume overly sweet foods, it programs their palates to seek more sweet food – shifting their dietary preferences away from the nutrient rich vegetables, proteins and dairy which they should be eating.

Amounts of sugar in food

As a rule of thumb, small children should consume no more than 20g of added sugars in their diet each day. This leaves very little room for processed foods in the diet whatsoever. Foods that commonly add sugars into the diets of small children include biscuits, even plain sweet ones, sauces such as tomato sauce, fruit drinks including juice and cordial, snack bars and treats. Often daily treats of baby muffins, banana bread, chocolates, lollies and cakes pack in 20 to 30g of sugar per serve. It is for this reason that they should be included in the diets of small children at most once each week.

Tips for checking sugar intake

When it comes to checking how much sugar is in your child’s diet, choosing packaged foods which do not list sugar on the nutritional label or ingredients list is a step in the right direction. Another tip is to look for products which contain less than 10g of sugars per 100g, or less than 5g per serve. And of course the less sugar the food contains, the better.

If you are particularly interested in keeping the sugar in your child’s diet low, it might be worth calculating how much they are consuming via a diet program such as ‘My Fitness Pal’. This way, you can check for yourself, as in the below example, how much sugar your child is consuming. Remember, milk and fruit does contain some sugars and these sugars can be included in a healthy diet – however dairy foods should not be flavoured and fruit should be consumer in its natural form to keep the intake of sugars as low as possible.

Typical Kids DietSugars (g) Low Sugar Diet Sugars (g)
Weet-Bix and Sugar

10g

Egg on toast or Organic Oats

0g

Muesli bar

5g

Corn cakes with cheese

0g

Fruit juice

20g

Water

0g

Sandwich

0g

Sandwich

0g

Fruit

10g

Fruit or Fruit Snacks

10g

Muffin or banana bread

25g

Sushi roll

5g

Meat and tomato sauce

5g

Meat and low sugar sauce or Broccoli Beef and Brown Rice Baby Food

<2g

Potato

0g

Potato

0g

Peas

0g

Peas

0g

Ice cream

20g

Greek yogurt and berries

10g

TOTALS

95g

 

27g*

*This example includes natural and added sugars.

 

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Important Notice to Parents and Guardians

  • The World Health Organisation recommends that breastfeeding is best for your baby.
  • Having a balanced diet when breastfeeding is also important. Infant Formulas should only be used after you’ve sought advice from a doctor or health practitioner.
  • A decision not to breastfeed can be difficult to reverse and introducing partial bottle feeding may reduce the supply of breast milk. It is also wise to consider the cost of infant formula.
  • If you use infant formula, all preparation and feeding instructions must be followed as per the manufacturer’s instructions. This is important for your baby’s health.