Important notice to customers — product packaging changesLearn More

NEW FOOD PACKAGING IN STORE NOW

From August 2018, customers will notice our rebranded food packaging start to appear on shelf in all major stockists.

  • CURRENT Packaging
  • new Packaging

We are excited to announce our new packaging will start to appear on shelf from August 2018. This transition to new packaging will occur over a number of months. During this time there will be a mix of current and new packaging on shelf.

There are no major changes to these products, in some instances there is a small name change or slight recipe improvement, see below for the full details.

Products purchased via the website will be delivered to customers in our old packaging until the end of October. From November, products ordered from the website will be delivered in the new packaging.

Please note, our Infant Formula packaging will not be rebranded until later in 2019.

For any questions, connect with our team of accredited practising Dietitians on +61 3 6332 9200

Product name changes

  • Cereal Name Changes
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Baby Rice
  • NEW Packaging Organic Rice with Prebiotic (GOS) Note: Our Baby Rice recipe has been upgraded to now include GOS Prebiotic
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Vanilla Rice Custard
  • NEW Packaging Organic Milk & Vanilla Baby Rice
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Apple & Cinnamon Porridge
  • NEW Packaging Organic Apple & Cinnamon Baby Porridge
  • Ready To Serve Name Changes
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Banana, Pear & Mango
  • New Packaging Organic Banana, Pear, Apple & Mango
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Mango, Blueberry & Apple
  • New Packaging Organic Blueberry, Mango & Apple
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Peach & Apple
  • New Packaging Organic Grape, Apple & Peach
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Pumpkin & Tomato Risotto
  • New Packaging Organic Pumpkin, Sweet Potato & Tomato
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Broccoli, Beef & Brown Rice
  • New Packaging Organic Beef & Vegetables
  • Note: We have also upgraded some of our RTS recipes to remove added sugars and to remove some of the more complex ingredients that are not required for young children such as Tamari.
  • RUSKS NAME CHANGES
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Milk Rusks Toothiepegs
  • New Packaging Organic Milk Rusks
Home/Nutrition & Recipes/Articles/Important Nutrients Your Baby Needs: Minerals

Important Nutrients Your Baby Needs: Minerals

We all know that vitamins and minerals play a crucial role in the health and development of our children. They’re essential organic compounds that our bodies use for a variety of metabolic purposes, and the best ways to get them are through a healthy and varied diet. In the first 12 months, the nutrition your baby receives is important in shaping their long-term health. There are so many considerations about your baby’s diet that it is probably making your head spin. This article provides a concise list of all the important minerals that you should consider for your baby in the first 12 months.

1: Important minerals, their function and source

The table below outlines some important vitamins to consider in the first 12 months to ensure your baby is meeting their nutrient needs for adequate growth and development. Whether your baby is breastfed, or formula fed, their requirements are still the same. From around 6 months of age your baby will commence solids. At around this time, the requirements of iron increase significantly as breastmilk and formula cannot exclusively meet the iron needed for growth and development. Therefore, it is important that a baby’s first foods include those with iron.

Mineral

Function

Source

Amount required/day

(6-12months) (Recommended Daily Intake)

Risk of deficiency

IronTransporting oxygen in the blood to tissues

Immune function Muscle function Cognitive functioning

Red meat, poultry including pork, eggs, legumes e.g. lentils, spinach and silverbeet, figs

11mg/day

Iron deficiency Anaemia is one of the most common deficiencies in young children.

· Increased risk if mother deficient at birth

· Can lead to lethargy, weakness, poor immune function poor brain development

ZincMaintain structural integrity of proteins

Rgulation of gene expression

Meat, shellfish, lentils, chickpeas, eggs and dairy

3mg/day

Deficiency can lead to growth retardation, loss of appetite, and impaired immune function
CalciumBone development – strength and function

Strong teeth

Cow’s milk (toddlers >12 months) Breastmilk, Infant formula, cheese, yoghurt, custard, sesame seeds, broccoli, tofu, soy

270mg/day

Calcium deficiency can lead to poor bone and tooth formation

Increases the risk of developing osteoporosis in later life (weak and frail bones)

IodineEssential for making thyroid hormones

These hormones control the body’s metabolism

And contribute to bone and brain development during infancy

Tuna, Seaweed, milk (toddlers >12 months) yoghurt, cheese

110ug/day

A common deficiency across the world.

Can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders in newborns and can lead to lower IQ in young children

MagnesiumMaintain normal nerve

Muscle function

Supports a healthy immune system

Green leafy vegetables, figs, avocado, chickpeas and kidney beans, peas, broccoli

75mg/day

Whilst rare, a deficiency may cause extreme fatigue, muscle cramps, and may impact mental health

Trace elements

Trace elements are nutrients that are required in very small amounts. These trace elements are generally quite easy to consume providing your baby has a varied and healthy diet. These include, but not limited to:

  • Selenium – this is found in tuna, pork, beef, chicken, tofu, and mushrooms
  • Copper – this is found in liver, shitake mushrooms and leafy greens. Copper helps to maintain healthy bones, blood vessels, nerves, and immune Selenium helps your body make special proteins, called antioxidant enzymes. These play a role in preventing cell damage.
  • Chromium – found in broccoli, potatoes, and green beans, whole-grain products, beef and poultry. Chromium has many functions including brain function and fatty acid and cholesterol production.

2: Strategies to increase mineral intake in your baby

The key to ensuring your baby is getting in all their minerals through their diet is to ensure they are consuming a balanced and healthy diet with texture appropriate foods.

According to the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) it is recommended that you should start solids with your baby from around 6 months. This is to meet the increasing nutritional and developmental needs of an infant. At around this time, it is encouraged to incorporate iron enriched foods and foods from all of the five food groups that are texture appropriate. This means that your baby can be exposed to a range of nutrients including all the essential vitamins.

Baby led weaning (BLW) is also referred to as baby led feeding. Traditionally, BLW skips the pureed and mashed texture phases of starting solids. Rather than offering your baby a mouthful of mashed pumpkin and apple, you will instead offer soft cooked pieces of pumpkin and long, peeled pieces of apple for them to suck, chew and mash using their fingers and mouth. If you choose to offer this type of feeding to your infant, try and monitor how much food is consumed to help avoid the development of any nutrient deficiencies.

3: Popular nutrient rich recipes

Recipe

Ingredients and method

Nutrients

Minced beef and lentil bolognaise with penne· Minced beef slow cooked until tender in a pot with tomato, herbs, spices and brown lentils
· Cook pasta until well cooked and soft and serve together
Iron, Chromium, Selenium, Zinc, Magnesium
Homemade fish fingers with steamed broccoli and sweet potato· Use tinned salmon or tuna, add egg, herbs, spices and cover in breadcrumbs. Oven back or lightly fry maintaining softness, Offer a puree or soft cooked broccoli and sweet potatoIron, Zinc, Magnesium, Iodine, Chromium, Calcium
Scrambled eggs with pureed spinach and wholemeal toast soldiers· Scramble eggs using some cheese and milk. Puree or wilt spinach through the eggs and offer wholemeal bread soldiersIron, Magnesium, Calcium, Zinc
Chicken liver pate· Chicken liver, low salt stock, herbs and spices.
· Cook the livers with olive oil and add the herbs and spices. Add stock to the livers and mix using a blender
· You can add this puree to other vegetables
Copper, Iron, Zinc, Magnesium

Summary

We all know that vitamins and minerals play a crucial role in the health and development of our children. In the first 12 months, the nutrition your baby receives is important in shaping their long-term health. There are a number of minerals that can be obtained by consuming a broad and varied diet that should be offered to baby’s from the moment they commence solids.

Breastfeeding is best

The World Health Organisation recommends that breastfeeding is best for your baby such that breastfeeding will provide the best start to life nutritionally and will also bring other benefits to a mother and her baby. Having a balanced diet when breastfeeding is also important. Infant Formulas should only be used after you’ve sought advice from a doctor or health practitioner. A decision not to breastfeed can be difficult to reverse and introducing partial bottle feeding may reduce the supply of breast milk. It is also wise to consider the cost of infant formula. If you use infant formula, all preparation and feeding instructions must be followed as per the manufacturer’s instructions. This is important for your baby’s health.

Disclaimer: The content of this document is solely for educational purposes and should not be substituted for medical advice. You are solely responsible for forming your own opinions and conclusions on such matters and for making your own independent assessment of the information. Please consult your doctor if you are concerned about your baby’s health.

About the author

Marisa Nastasi is an Accredited Practising Dietitian for Bellamy’s Organic. She specialises in children's nutrition and has recently completed further studies in paediatric dietetics. She has worked in the industry for 8 years and has developed a strong working knowledge on how good quality diets can benefit the health of children so that they can develop to their full potential.

Important Notice to Parents and Guardians

  • The World Health Organisation recommends that breastfeeding is best for your baby.
  • Having a balanced diet when breastfeeding is also important. Infant Formulas should only be used after you’ve sought advice from a doctor or health practitioner.
  • A decision not to breastfeed can be difficult to reverse and introducing partial bottle feeding may reduce the supply of breast milk. It is also wise to consider the cost of infant formula.
  • If you use infant formula, all preparation and feeding instructions must be followed as per the manufacturer’s instructions. This is important for your baby’s health.