Important notice to customers — product packaging changesLearn More

NEW FOOD PACKAGING IN STORE NOW

From August 2018, customers will notice our rebranded food packaging start to appear on shelf in all major stockists.

  • CURRENT Packaging
  • new Packaging

We are excited to announce our new packaging will start to appear on shelf from August 2018. This transition to new packaging will occur over a number of months. During this time there will be a mix of current and new packaging on shelf.

There are no major changes to these products, in some instances there is a small name change or slight recipe improvement, see below for the full details.

Products purchased via the website will be delivered to customers in our old packaging until the end of October. From November, products ordered from the website will be delivered in the new packaging.

Please note, our Infant Formula packaging will not be rebranded until later in 2019.

For any questions, connect with our team of accredited practising Dietitians on +61 3 6332 9200

Product name changes

  • Cereal Name Changes
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Baby Rice
  • NEW Packaging Organic Rice with Prebiotic (GOS) Note: Our Baby Rice recipe has been upgraded to now include GOS Prebiotic
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Vanilla Rice Custard
  • NEW Packaging Organic Milk & Vanilla Baby Rice
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Apple & Cinnamon Porridge
  • NEW Packaging Organic Apple & Cinnamon Baby Porridge
  • Ready To Serve Name Changes
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Banana, Pear & Mango
  • New Packaging Organic Banana, Pear, Apple & Mango
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Mango, Blueberry & Apple
  • New Packaging Organic Blueberry, Mango & Apple
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Peach & Apple
  • New Packaging Organic Grape, Apple & Peach
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Pumpkin & Tomato Risotto
  • New Packaging Organic Pumpkin, Sweet Potato & Tomato
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Broccoli, Beef & Brown Rice
  • New Packaging Organic Beef & Vegetables
  • Note: We have also upgraded some of our RTS recipes to remove added sugars and to remove some of the more complex ingredients that are not required for young children such as Tamari.
  • RUSKS NAME CHANGES
  • CURRENT Packaging Organic Milk Rusks Toothiepegs
  • New Packaging Organic Milk Rusks

How to Check if Your Baby is Feeding Enough

It can be very difficult to determine how much food your baby should be eating. So many changes occur in the first 12 months. By 6 months, you would have established a feeding routine whether it be with breastmilk or formula. From 6 months, you are then faced with the commencement of solids and now having to fit this into the routine that you have worked so hard to establish. Don’t fear! This article provides some guidance of how much milk and food is recommended from 7-12 months to help support your baby’s continued growth and development.

1. How much milk should my baby be consuming?

Breastmilk is the primary source of nutrition for a baby up to 6 months as it provides all the nutrients and energy required to grow and develop. Where breastfeeding is not an option, infant formula products may provide an alternative. The average volume of milk consumed from 1-6 months in 750-800mL/ 24 hours although this is a general guide.

From around 6 months, your baby should be introduced to solids. Whilst milk (breastmilk and/or infant formula) still does essential nutrients from 6-12 months, it is important to trial new foods (especially those containing iron such as meat, eggs and lentils) and ensure that your baby is getting a balance of milk and food to maximise their nutritional intake. Between 7-12 months your baby can consume an average of 600mL of milk per day. As your baby approaches 12 months, aim to decrease the milk intake to ensure they are not getting too full on milk, which can impact their appetite for food. Below is an example feeding guide from the Bellamy’s Organic Follow-on formula. From 12 months of age, toddlers are recommended to consume between 250-500mL of milk per day.

Bellamy’s Organic Feeding Table for Step 2 Follow on formula

2. How much food should my baby be consuming?

It can be confusing to know how much food your baby should be eating from 7-12 months. Below is a guide on how much a child from 7-12 months should be consuming per day. As we know, all babies are different and the volume of food they consume may be more or less than the guidelines below. If you are concerned with how your baby is eating, speak to you doctor or maternal child health nurse for some tailored advice.

National Health and Medical Research Council Eat for Health Guidelines

What does an average day of eating look like?

Below is an example of a daily meal plan that incorporates the recommended foods and serves from 7-12 months. Consult your doctor or Accredited Practising Dietitian for further support.

  • From 6-9 months, it is recommended that you commence with the baby’s usual milk (Breastmilk or Formula) and then offer solids.
  • From around 10 months, you can offer solids first followed by your baby’s usual milk. Your baby will determine when they have been fed enough.

Meal plan (~10 months)

5.30-6.30am

  Breastfeed or Formula feed

7am

7.30am

  Breastfeed or Formula feed (top up)

9am

  Fruit pieces and yoghurt

11.30 -12.30pm

  • Pieces of chicken/beef/fish with pasta shapes / chopped cherry tomato/ cucumber/ cheese
  • Toasted sandwich with cheese / avocado / tomato / tuna
  • Sushi
  • Frittata with roasted potato and pumpkin

12.30pm

  Breastfeed or Formula feed (top up)

2pm

4-5pm

  Modified family meal

5.30pm

  Breastfeed or Formula feed (top up)

Overnight

  Breastfeed or Formula feed

* This is only a guide and does not factor in any specific dietary restrictions such as allergies. Suitable meal plan from around 10 months of age but can be adapted to a specific age between 7-12 months

3. How do I know if my baby is feeding enough?

From birth, your baby will have their weight, height and head circumference measured on specific growth charts. This growth is tracked by a Maternal Child Health Nurse and/or your baby’s doctor. These health professionals are a great source of information in relation to the patterns and trends of growth for your little one. They will look at patterns of growth to determine if your baby is feeding enough. If your baby is trending downwards (losing weight or not gaining enough weight) for their age, the Maternal Child Health Nurse may recommend some changes in the baby’s diet. Similarly, changes might be recommended if your baby is trending upwards (gaining more weight than usual). You will have scheduled appointments with them up to when your child is three-and-a-half.

Babies are born with the ability to self-regulate their feeding. This means, when they are full, they will intuitively stop feeding. Force feeding is not encouraged particularly at the time your baby commences solids. Offer a variety of foods and provide a happy environment around feeding which will help encourage greater appreciation of new foods. Try and balance milk with solids and where possible separate out the time between solids and milk to prevent fullness on milk alone. Avoid fast food, fried foods and foods high in sugar and salt as this will not only promote unhealthy habits, but may impact on weight and dental health.

To determine if your baby is hydrated, you can check the colour of their urine in the nappy. If it’s dark, this might indicate that your baby is dehydrated and may require more milk. From around 6 months of age, you may also wish to give your baby some boiled and cooled water, particularly if you think they might be dehydrated. You should discuss this with your Maternal Child Health Nurse if you suspect dehydration.

Summary

From 6 months, your baby will be commencing solids in conjunction to consuming their usual milk. Whilst is can be daunting to determine if your baby is consuming enough, the growth of your baby provides you the feedback to determine if in fact they are feeding enough. The important things to remember:

  • Milk (Breastmilk and/or Infant formula) still provides the primary source of nutrition from 7 months of age
  • Between 7-12 months your baby can consume an average of 600mL of milk per day in conjunction with a verity of texture appropriate solid foods from the five food groups
  • From 6-9 months, it is recommended that you commence with the baby’s usual milk (Breastmilk or Formula) and then offer solids.
  • From around 10 months, you can offer solids first followed by your baby’s usual milk. Your baby will determine when they have been fed enough.

If you are concerned about your baby’s growth, eating patterns, speak with your Maternal Child Health Nurse or your baby’s doctor as the can provide you with the necessary support and advice.

Breastfeeding is best

The World Health Organisation recommends that breastfeeding is best for your baby such that breastfeeding will provide the best start to life nutritionally and will also bring other benefits to a mother and her baby. Having a balanced diet when breastfeeding is also important. Infant Formulas should only be used after you’ve sought advice from a doctor or health practitioner. A decision not to breastfeed can be difficult to reverse and introducing partial bottle feeding may reduce the supply of breast milk. It is also wise to consider the cost of infant formula. If you use infant formula, all preparation and feeding instructions must be followed as per the manufacturer’s instructions. This is important for your baby’s health.

Disclaimer: The content of this document is solely for educational purposes and should not be substituted for medical advice. You are solely responsible for forming your own opinions and conclusions on such matters and for making your own independent assessment of the information. Please consult your doctor if you are concerned about your baby’s health.

About the author

Marisa Nastasi is an Accredited Practising Dietitian for Bellamy’s Organic. She specialises in children's nutrition and has recently completed further studies in paediatric dietetics. She has worked in the industry for 8 years and has developed a strong working knowledge on how good quality diets can benefit the health of children so that they can develop to their full potential.

Important Notice to Parents and Guardians

  • The World Health Organisation recommends that breastfeeding is best for your baby.
  • Having a balanced diet when breastfeeding is also important. Infant Formulas should only be used after you’ve sought advice from a doctor or health practitioner.
  • A decision not to breastfeed can be difficult to reverse and introducing partial bottle feeding may reduce the supply of breast milk. It is also wise to consider the cost of infant formula.
  • If you use infant formula, all preparation and feeding instructions must be followed as per the manufacturer’s instructions. This is important for your baby’s health.